Posts Tagged ‘rose’

Pasadena PinotFest 2010, 2nd Annual

January 31, 2010
Pasadena PinotFest

Pasadena PinotFest draws a crowd

I made a sort of “wine resolution” at the beginning of the year to drink more Pinot Noir.  To that end, this month I have attended not one but two big tasting events featuring Pinot Noir.  The most recent, the Pasadena PinotFest, was held at the University Club of Pasadena on January 30.  I had not been to the venerable facility since my friends Jerry and Robin had their wedding reception there.  It was a jumpin’ joint that night, but the wine crowd got the room rockin’, too.

Pasadena PinotFest

Pinot lovers and Pinot pourers

A full house made their way from winery table to winery table, stopping to refresh their palates at a major cheese station, a carving table for assorted meats and a wonderful island where succulent braised short ribs were served atop a pile of cheesy grits.  Pleasure abounded from wall to wall.

Nearly 50 wineries were represented, and not all of them felt obliged to restrict their pours to Pinot Noir.  Quite a few brought Chardonnays and Syrahs with them, while I did see one Pinot Gris and a rose.  It was a Pinot Noir rose, however.

Pasadena PinotFest

I parked behind Clos Pepe

Although the room was crowded, I was able to make it in good fashion up and down the aisles.  At no time was it difficult to get close enough to the pourers to hear what they had to say about the wines.  In fact, at an event earlier in the month, I had some difficulty getting close to the Clos Pepe table.  This time around, winemaker Wes Hagen was able to devote his entire attention to my questions for several minutes.  That’s probably not the way he would have preferred it, but it worked very well for me.

Pasadena PinotFest

Ribs and grits

Hagen poured some of his prized rose to start.  He explained that for this pink wine, his grapes are taken a full six weeks before other Pinot growers begin harvesting.  He feels he can get full fruit flavor without letting the grapes possibly get overripe.  I agree.  The Clos Pepe rose has one of the best fruit presences I can remember tasting in a pink wine.  Moreover, his Pinot Noir seems almost like an extension of the rose rather than a different wine entirely.

Pasadena PinotFest

A fave

Another big favorite for me was Row 11 Russian River Valley 2007.  The spices were so delicious this one really did make my eyes open wide.  According to the pourer, winemaker Richard de los Reyes makes New World Pinot Noir by selecting the “best vineyards, in the best appellations and taking the best rows.”  She explained that’s where the name, Row 11, comes from.  Reyes can walk any vineyard in California and select any row he likes.  He apparently likes Row 11.

Pasadena PinotFest

Another fave

I was also taken with the Windstream 2008 Pinot.  It’s a big, floral, rich wine which is, I’m told, “the winemaker’s baby.”  Winemaker Anthony Riboli, of the Los Angeles winemaking Riboli Family, really impressed me with this wine.

Pasadena PinotFest

Anthony Riboli, Windstream

The Pasadena PinotFest served as a fundraiser for Hillsides, a Pasadena-based nonprofit organization doing good work for Southern California’s children.  If you weren’t able to help by attending, please click on their name and explore other opportunities to help.

Here are some of the wines I sampled (all are Pinot Noir):

Ampelos Lambda 2006 – very good

Ampelos Rho 2006 Barrel Select – excellent, bright and earthy on nose and palate

Ampelos Fiddlestix Vineyard 2007 – subdued fruit, somewhat green

Alma Rosa  Santa Rita Hills 2007 – nice and earthy

Alma Rosa La Encantada Vineyard 2005 – wild nose, got a lot of attention from other tasters while I was there

Badge 2006 – complex nose, spicy taste

Baileyana Grand Fire Peak Cuvee 2007 – earthy and full

Cargasacchi Point Concepcion Salsipuedes 2008 – barnyard nose, nice mineral profile

Cargasacchi Estate, Cargasacchi-Jalama Vineyard 2007 – brighter and more vibrant than Concepcion

Clos Pepe Rose 2009 – strawberry, 11.5% abv, great fruit presence, very “real”

Clos Pepe 2006 – like and “extension” of the rose, darker and fuller

Clos Pepe 2007 – even fruitier and fuller than ’06

Derby 2006 – very good nose

Ken Brown Santa Maria Valley 2007 – violets

Ken Brown Sta. Rita Hills 2007 – great sense of earth

Ken Brown Clos Pepe Vineyard 2007 – dark and brooding

Loring 2008 – like candy on the nose

Loring Gary’s Vineyard 2008 – herbaceous, bright and delicious

Marimar Don Miguel Vineyard 2006 – lovely and dark

Marimar Dona Margarita Vineyard 2006 – big nose, subdued fruit

Row 11 Russian River 2007 – OMG! great spices

Stephen Ross Chorro Creek 2007 – nice minerals

Tin House 2005 – very nice earth, big, sourced in Edna Valley

Windstream 2008 – very big taste, floral and rich, “winemaker’s baby”

A Sunday in the Santa Ynez Valley

September 27, 2009

Living in Los Angeles has its good points.  One of them is that when it’s time to get out of Dodge for a few hours, there are some pretty wonderful places to go.  Beaches, mountains, desert, forest – take your pick of pleasures.  When it’s time for me to get away, one of my favorite locales is wine country.

I like the Central Coast.  There’s something to be said for geographical desirability.  A scant two and a half hours from L.A. lies the Santa Ynez Valley.  I have really come to love the wines from this beautiful countryside, despite the pun in the title of my blog.  I have one colleague in the Santa Barbara area who always needles me that it should be “Now and Pinot.”  Not a fan of wine puns, apparently.  But whatever the varietal, I so look forward to my tasting trips to that magical area.

One recent Wednesday came and it was time to get away.  But as is often the case, the occasion would not present itself until Sunday. When it did, though, we put Los Angeles in the rear-view mirror until the 101 turned right and all that was around us was wine country.

I’ll limit myself to the four winery stops we made, although there were many other visits that added a lot of pleasure to the day. For one thing, you should stop at every single farm stand you see. There’s still corn available, but the strawberries and blueberries are about done. Apples and pears are coming up, though.

*****

syvFoleyFoley Estate Vineyards and Winery – Bill Foley is the envy of many in the wine business. His vineyards in the limestone-rich Santa Rita Hills are perfectly situated for growing wonderful Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. The beautiful wine country that surrounds his tasting room off Highway 246 provides the perfect locale for sampling those wines. The tasting room itself is pretty nice, too.

Tasting notes:
Chardonnay, Steel 2008 ($28) – There’s a tropical nose – star fruit? – and also lime aromas. Clean and crisp on the tongue, well balanced with a very nice finish.
Chardonnay, Rancho Santa Rosa 2007 ($30) – 12 months in oak for this one. Apples and pears are on the nose with a great little hint of butterscotch on top of the crisp fruit flavors. It seems more crisp that lush. A buttery finish.
Foley & Johnson Dry Rose 2008 ($18) – Rhone blend (Syrah, Grenache, Grenache Gris and Cinsault) is a very pale salmon color. It smells just like a rose! Melon flavors, good acidity, very dry. Medium mouthfeel and finish. A tasting room exclusive.
Pinot Noir, Rancho Santa Rosa 2007 ($40) – A medium-deep red color, very pretty. Nose of blackberries and cherries. It’s a very full bodied Pinot. Traces of tea on the palate. Good tannins, but very smooth.
Pinot Noir, Barrel Select 2007 ($50) – An earthy nose with black cherry aromas. Quite interesting on the tongue, with mushroom flavors and coffee, tea. Great finish. A tasting room exclusive.

syvDSLDierberg and Star Lane Vineyards – Jim and Mary Dierberg planted their first grapes in 1997. The idea was to buy some land either in Napa or Bordeaux. Those areas seemed a little crowded, though, and they fell in love with Santa Barbara County at first sight. Between the Dierberg and Star Lane vineyards, the microclimates are well-covered, from coolest to warmest. That gives Dierberg and Star Lane the flexibility to produce a number of wines from fruit sourced on their own property. The big, green barn is a head-turner and the tasting room occupies about a quarter of it.

Tasting notes:
Star Lane Sauvignon Blanc 2007 ($20) – Very New Zealand. A steel/wood combination, the nose offers floral notes and grapefruit dominates the palate. Good acidity.
Dierberg Chardonnay 2006 ($32) – A funky little nose. There’s a nutty flavor I really like. Rather heavily influenced by wood. Not a bad thing.
Dierberg Pinot Noir 2006 ($42) – Mushroomy minerals on the nose. Earthy taste with nice tannins. Maybe a little rough for some.
Star Lane Merlot 2006 ($36) – Coffee and chocolate on the nose. Very nice flavor. 9% Cab Franc, 3% Cab Sauvignon.
Dierberg Syrah 2006 ($34) – Very dark in color with a smokey, leathery nose. Tastes of chalky minerals, and blackberry. Yum.
Star Lane Cabernet Sauvignon 2005 ($42) – The floral, perfumy nose gives way to a taste of the Old West: dusty sage predominant. Very smooth. 80% Cab S, 15% Cab Franc, 5% Petit Verdot.
Star Lane Cabernet Sauvignon “Astral” 2005 ($80) – This reserve cab was a surprise taste. 100%, from the highest part of the Star Lane property. Very chocolatey, rich nose. Smooth, complex taste with earth and coffee notes, lucsious blackberry.
Three Saints Cabernet Sauvignon 2005 ($22) – Another surprise taste, not on the menu. Tastes of raspberry, cherry, blueberry. Good structure.

syvShoestringShoestring Winery – I have probably passed Shoestring Winery two dozen times, always on the way to a restaurant or another winery. I made it a point to stop in and visit on this trip. I’m glad I did. The people were nice, the tasting room and the surrounding grounds were comfortable and the wines were tasty. Picnic tables around the corner from the front door were in bright sun when I stopped by in mid-afternoon, but a couple of large chairs in front were shaded by some spreading trees. It was nice and cool inside, of course, since the tasting room is actually in the barrel room.

Tasting notes:
Rose 2008 ($22) – Light orange in the glass. Not much acidity, but a lovely flavor is very attractive.
Pinot Grigio 2008 ($22) – Flowery with good acidity. Should be a hit with seafood.
Sangiovese 2008 ($35) – Outrageous nose! 26 months in oak. Tastes and smells of cherries and smoke. 10% Cab Franc. My favorite.
Merlot 2005 ($35) – Cola time! Same oak as Sangio (26 months) but seems a little excessive here. Cab Franc blend. Very soft tannins, quite smooth.
Syrah 2005 ($35) – Fruit-forward and oaky (28 months). Very full mouthfeel. They serve it with a square of chocolate, and it’s a great idea. Very rich wine.

syvLincourtLincourt Wines – I ended the day the same way I began it, at a Foley property. Lincourt is the little sister winery to Foley Estates. Founded in 1996 by Bill Foley at a former dairy farm, the grounds are beautiful and interesting. The winery and barrel room were once barns, and look it. The tasting room is a Sears Craftsman kit home of the 1920s. I’m sure it was a fine farmhouse then. I know it’s a fine a tasting room now. The place is charming.

Tasting notes:

Pinot Blanc, Courtney’s Vineyard 2008 ($20) – Melon on the nose, nutty at the end, minerals all over. My favorite, although there’s a lot of competition here.

Sauvignon Blanc, Alamo Pintado Vineyard 2008 ($18) – One of Kris Curran’s first vintages for Lincourt. My pourer pointed out that Curran is known for Pinot Noir, but she’s also good with white wines. No kidding!

Foley and Johnson Rosé 2008 ($18) – The same as the pink from the Foley tasting room: Rhone blend (Syrah, Grenache, Grenache Gris and Cinsault) is a very pale salmon color. It smells just like a rose! Melon flavors, good acidity, very dry. Medium mouthfeel and finish.

Chardonnay, Rancho Santa Rosa 2007 ($26) – Plenty of citrus, but nice and creamy, too.

Pinot Noir, Santa Barbara County 2007 ($28) – Dark fruit and spices on the nose. Big clove action. Medium mouthfeel, with a creaminess and smooth tannins. 12 months in French oak.

Merlot, La Cuesta Vineyard 2005 ($35) – Menthol on the nose? Normally Lincourt blends their Merlot with Cabernet. This one they felt was good enough to stand on its own. I agree.

Tasting Event: Wine, Cheese, Chocolate

August 9, 2009



My wife and I had the opportunity to attend a tasting event in downtown Los Angeles recently. Our hosts were the members of the group Los Angeles Wine Tasting, fronted by Jean-Baptiste. On a Friday night in early August, we drove east until we were among the skyscrapers.

This group hosts events in a residential high-rise on Grand Avenue called Evo South. From the subterranean parking garage to the rooftop lounge where the event was held, the building has that brand-new smell and look still on it. The garage, in fact, appeared to be rather unfinished. No problem. We didn’t stay in the garage too long.

Up to the rooftop we went, to a swanky penthouse with an outdoor balcony which overlooks downtown L.A. The view was really astounding, and being able to step outside from time to time lent a bit of variety to the evening. The glass sliding doors which separated the lounge from the balcony were open, so the room had an outdoorsy feel.

The wines were poured out on the balcony, while the cheese was served inside the lounge. On the cheese table there was an assortment of breads. The evening’s tasting menu was in four little courses. Here’s how it went:

First, we got a pour of Terree des Papes, Cotes du Rhone, 2007. Obviously this was a French blend of Viognier, Grenache Blanc and Clairette, earthy and crisp with good minerality and a nice finish. Along with it we were given a Swiss cheese, Appenzeller. This cow’s milk cheese was quite nutty and mild. I had mine with olive bread.

Next up was the Demoiselles Coiffees, Cotes du Ventoux, 2008. This Provence rose was a dry blend of Grenache, Carignan and Cinsault. I picked up lots of strawberry on the nose and palate. The acidity was quite good and as such, it paired very well with the gorgonzola Dolcelatte. Made from cow’s milk in Italy, the cheese was strong and hearty with walnut bread. We had actually had this cheese before at home, so we were happy to see it on the menu. It’s a favorite.

We left Europe for the third tasting. Next stop Chile. Montgras from the Colchagua Valley, 2008. This Carmenere was extremely oaky, but quite interesting. The blackberry flavors went well with a Manchego cheese. The Bermuda Triangle cheese from Arcata, California was a little late in getting to the table, so we helped ourselves to some other cheesy treats on a coffee table. As you might expect, when the Bermuda Triangle came out it was a triangular shaped goat cheese with a really nice and funky taste.

The fourth destination was also in South America. Monte de Luz 2007 from Uruguay was our final wine. This bold red was my first taste of the Tannat grape. Since tannins are suggested in the varietal’s name, it wasn’t too surprising to find that it’s extremely tannic. Originating from the Basque region in southwest France, it still thrives there. It’s a very strong wine both on the nose and palate, but there was substantial fruit to go along with the tannins. It was a good match for the Spanish Manchego Viejo. Made from sheep’s milk, Machego Viejo has a nutty quality but is quite subdued. It let the wine take center stage, that’s for sure.

As the title of the event promised, there were some chocolates for dessert. Valrhona Grand Cru de Terroir, dark chocolates from ‘Nyangbo, Ghana Africa sported 68% cocoa while the Alpaco of Ecuador was 66% cocoa.

The wines and chocolates were selected by L.A. Wine Tasting. The cheeses were selected by Laurent Bonjour. You may have seen him and his cheese truck at the West Hollywood Farmers’ Market, among others. He’s an excellent cheese man. The bread was provided by La Maison du Pain.

Tasting Notes: K&L Domestic Rhone Varietals

July 12, 2009

I have been meaning to get over to a tasting at K&L wines in Hollywood for what seems like ages. I finally made it over there today. As luck would have it, the topic of the day was domestic Rhone varietals. I like not only the wines produced using Rhone varietals, I also get a kick out of checking out the list of grapes that are used in the Rhone. I mean, if your restriction includes grapes like Bourboulenc and Piquepoul Blanc, why not just open the door and let ’em use anything? Seriously, it is interesting to find out how the 22 grapes of the Rhone are used by different winemakers. In California, of course, there are no restrictions on which grapes can be used. But there are plenty of winemakers who are ready to take up the challenge anyway.

There were 10 wines on the menu this afternoon. Prices ranged from $13 to $43, with a pretty even spread. Three of the wines were less than $20, three were in the $20 range, three were in the $30 range and only one was over $40.

Here are my notes:

Tablas Creek “Esprit de Beaucastel” Blanc 2007 (Paso Robles) – A classic Rhone-style blend to start with, this one was 68% Roussanne, 22% Grenache Blanc and 10% Piquepoul Blanc. Light grass and citrus on the nose, the taste was fairly tart and earthy.

Stolpman Vineyards “L’Avion” Estate Santa Ynez White 2006 – Funky on the nose and palate, but I mean that in a good way. Very grassy and oaky nose. Lots of that oak on the palate, too, with minerals coming through strongly.

Beckman Purisima Mountain Vineyard Grenache Rose 2008 – Strawberry red with a somewhat obscured nose, to my nose, anyway. Dry with a nice acidity, this should do well with food. The minerals seemed to outweigh the fruit, but I like that.

Copain “L’Hiver” Mendocino County Syrah 2006 – Dark purple in color, the wine had an oaky nose with mushroom notes. Blackberry, pepper and clove are all over the palate.

Skylark North Coast “Red Belly” Red Blend 2007 – 47% Carignane, 47% Syrah and 6% Grenache. I liked this before I tasted it. It’s a darkly colored wine, with oak and dark berries on the nose. It had a very nice earthiness, but a little too much heat.

Owen Roe “Sinister Hand” Columbia Valley Rhone Blend 2007 – This one is 62% Grenache, with the remainder split between Syrah and Mourvedre. Somewhat lighter in color than the previous two, with a medium body and a spicy, dark flavor.

Four Vines “Peasant” Paso Robles Red Blend 2007 – The makeup on this one screams “Rhone”: 33% Mourvedre, 30% Syrah, 25% Grenache, 7% Counoise and 5% Tannat. That last one sneaked in somehow, even though it is not a Rhone varietal. When you get down to the fifth grape, who’s keeping score? A ruby color with a slightly obscured nose and huge tannins.

Margerum “M5” Santa Barbara County Rhone Blend 2006 – This is another 5-pack, with 52% Syrah, 26% Grenache, 9% Mourvedre, 4% Counoise and 4% Cinsault. The other 5% comes from several different cofermentations of the separate grapes. The wine was somewhat light in color, with a raspberry/cranberry/clove component making itself quite known. It’s very different – and very nice.

Prospect 772 Sierra Foothill “The Brawler” 2006 – From Calaveras County, this wine is 96% Syrah and 4% Viognier. Fruity and oaky on the nose and the palate, it had a very hot finish.

Ojai “Melville Vineyard” Santa Rita Hills Syrah 2004 – Very dark purple in color, the nose was full of blackberry and spices. A very smooth palate featured raspberry and red plums.

 

Tasting Room Notes: Curtis Winery

July 11, 2009

A visit by my family recently took us to the beautiful Foxen Canyon Wine Trail.  If you haven’t treated yourself to the beauty of those hills, you really should.  Just up the road from Los Olivos, the views along Foxen Canyon Road are sometimes breathtaking and the wines that are produced in the wineries along that road are sometimes spectacular.  Here’s what they were pouring at Curtis Winery on our visit.

The tastings were being poured in the big barrel room in the rear of the shop.  Large, cool and dark, the barrel room is a great place to taste.  Five huge kegs and several of a more moderate size gave a real “winery” feel to the tasting that you just don’t get in the retail shop that occupies the front of the store.

The Viognier 2006 had a very floral nose with honeysuckle predominant.  The taste offered clean and crisp flavors of lime and pineapple.  It was a really nice wine that begged for seafood or just a sunny porch.  They were giving a nice deal on this wine during the first weekend in May, a free bottle with the purchase of two.  It was $22.

For pink lovers, the Heritage Rose 2007 was bright and fresh, but it gave a little too much grapefruit for my taste, and the nose was highlighted by lemongrass.  I didn’t care for it too much, but you may like those qualities more than I do.  

We crossed over to the dark side with the Crossroad Grenache 2005.  It was quite earthy and dark, right in my wheelhouse.  The Grenache was joined by Syrah and Cinsault and the combination produced a very complex flavor range.  There was a blackberry profile adorned with a smokiness and a nutty angle.  It was quite interesting.

The Heritage Cuvee 2005 was also dark and musky but with a spiciness to the fruit-forward taste.  A gorgeous nose made me delay enjoying that taste while I sniffed…and sniffed.  This Rhone-style blend contained Syrah, Mourvedre, Grenache and Cinsault.  It was my favorite of the day.

Another fine effort came with the Ambassador’s Vineyard Syrah 2005, which had a most intriguing nose which combined fresh, flowery notes with a darker side.  I detected black cherries with a long and enjoyable finish.

Lastly was the Rock Hollow Vineyard Syrah 2005, with a big fruit taste up front with nice tannins and chocolate at the end.  This was also a pleasure to smell as well as taste.